First Curlew of the year


The level of the Severn rose considerably on 1-2 February, though it is dropping again now; as a result, smaller local streams could not flow out into the Severn and have backed up on the meadows, bringing a light flood with perfect conditions for the birds – after a very short flood in the second half of November, this is the first real flood of this winter.

At Coombe Hill Meadows on 4 February, the circular walk was under water; some water on the boardwalk to the Grundon Hide, but the hide is perfectly accessible, scrapes on 1.05m. and shallow flooding everywhere. The first Curlew of the year (unringed) was sitting quietly on its own, feeding and preening, not calling at all, behaving just like a bird that had only just arrived from its winter quarters on an estuary or coast somewhere.  Also a Black-tailed Godwit and 340 Lapwings.  Sharp increase in duck numbers: 3 Mute Swans, 20 Canada Geese, 1 Shelduck, 1040 Wigeon, 1000 + Teal, 40 Mallard, 48 Pintails (29 males, 19 females, many paired but some courtship parties with more males), 20 Shoveler.  Flock of 16 Pied Wagtails, probably migrants.

At Boddington, where there have been several hundred Lapwings for the last week, none at all today.

At Severn Ham, Tewkesbury, no sign of any Curlews; 10 Mute Swans flew over to the south, 3 Cormorants were fishing on the Severn.

Near Corse, where there have been good numbers of Lapwings in the last few weeks, only about 30 left; also a large flock of at least 1,500  mixed Fieldfares and Redwings (mainly Fieldfares, probably at least 1,200) on a freshly planted field.

At Ashleworth Ham, where water levels were also higher: no Culrews yet, but 2 Mute Swans, 175 Canada Geese, 4 Greylag Geese, 1 Shelduck, 130 Wigeon, 800 Teal, 45 Mallard, 1 Pintail, 2 Shoveler, 3 Tufted Ducks, only 1 Lapwing, 2 Nuthatches, 1 Goldcrest.

 

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